Bless Your Heart

Almost everyone knows Southern women drop this phrase constantly. But it might not mean what you think it means. In reality, the phrase has little to do with religion and more to do with a passive-aggressive way to call you an idiot. Depending on your inflection, saying “bless your heart” can sting worse than any insult. The Business Insider listed the most ridiculous Southern sayings — and tried to explain them. OK, ya all, north or south, do you agree or disagree with their list?

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About Judy Hansen

I have lived in many cities in the US and even lived in Calgary,Alberta Canada. But I always seem to end up where my life began in Toledo, Ohio. I am a wife, a mother, a grandmother, sister, aunt, and I'll be your best friend!
This entry was posted in Educationial, Just for fun, Religion, Travel. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Bless Your Heart

  1. The Jewish part of me says in Yiddish, “Oy, vey!” The great Dane part of me says in Danish, “Uff da!”

  2. Pj Suttle says:

    Being a Southern Jewish woman, I do use that expression often and appropriately when deemed necessary to make my point while directly speaking to someone – I smile too when I let those sweet words escape my lips and look directly at the the person I’m speaking with. Or if in a small group/setting sometimes that delightful expression, “Why Bless her Soul” is used to make those others also smile /giggle about a particular person we’d rather NOT call a “crazy bitch” but the pause right after “Bless her Soul___” is most definitely the intended thought that does accompany said expression. It’s all about ‘holding that silent beat’ when one does use such a sweet genteel (albeit a passive aggressive) way of conveying one’s sentiments about someone or a situation.

    Recently I visited my Mother in NC. We went to see a family friend at a Nursing home with whom he has taken up company with a rather nasty old thing who’s doing her best to get her claws latched onto his finances, etc. While visiting with Mr. Biles, that ‘mean Heleen’ was spewing some horrid comments at my Mother and myself. She doesn’t even know me as that was my 1st visit, yet my Mother regularly goes to attend and see Mr. Biles often as she’s one of his executors and close friend of over 40 years and his neighbor. I digress – while being introduced to ‘mean Heleen’ the Nursing Home Director came up with us to Mr. Biles room and asked Heleen if she wouldn’t mind leaving us so we could have a visit. That crazy old shiksa became a nasty thing and started raising a ruckus as well as her voice. She even said something AT me (again I’ve NEVER had the displeasure on making this woman’s acquaintance until then) and that’s when I chose to just “kill her with kindness” rather than argue with an old disagreeable crazy woman. I genuinely looked humbled while smiling sweetly at her and said to her, “Well Bless Your Soul….” and just sat there smiling to let her know. She KNEW exactly what I meant and said as did Mr. Biles, my Mother and the Nursing home director. After that ‘mean Heleen’ left Mr. Biles room with his TV remote and EVERYONE smiled and gave a soft chuckle. I then had to figure how to turn the volume down from his TV w/o the remote.

    It’s a WONDERFUL expression I’ll always cherish and use when needed. It just has a more pleasant way of sounding less harsh under certain circumstances.

  3. Judy Hansen says:

    Right on Pj, love ya!

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